Alesteen Roedox

Over the past ten years, tens of millions of dollars have been collected by Bill Clinton for the William J. Clinton Foundation.  From governments in the Middle East to tycoons from Canada, India, Nigeria, the Ukraine and other international figures with interests in American foreign policy, some of the world’s richest 200,000 people and most famous celebrities handed over money to finance his presidential library and charitable activities.

 

The donor list offers a glimpse into the high-powered, big-dollar world in which Mr. Clinton has traveled since leaving the White House as he jetted around the globe making money for himself and raising vast sums for his ambitious philanthropic programs fighting disease, poverty and climate change.

 

Mr. Clinton did not provide the nationality or occupation of the donors, the dates they contributed or the precise amounts of their gifts, instead breaking down contributors by dollar ranges.

 

Many benefactors are well-known Americans, like Stephen L. Bing; Alfonso Fanjul; Bill Gates; Tom Golisano, a billionaire who ran for New York governor; Rupert Murdoch; and Barbra Streisand. Bloomberg PL.P., the financial media empire founded by Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg of New York, contributed, as did Freddie Mac, the mortgage company now partly blamed for the housing market collapse.

 

Another potentially sensitive donation came from Blackwater Training Center, part of the private security firm hired to protect American diplomats in Iraq.  Five of its guards have been indicted for their roles in a 2007 shooting that left 17 Iraqi civilians dead.  The potential for appearances of conflict was illustrated by Amar Singh, a politician in India who gave $1 million to $5 million.

 

Other donors have connections with India, a potential flashpoint because of tensions with Pakistan.  Among them was Lakshmi Mittal, a steel magnate and, according to Forbes magazine, the fourth-richest person in the world. Mr. Mittal, who donated $1 million to $5 million, was involved in a scandal in 2002 in London, where he lives.  After Mr. Mittal made a large donation to the Labor Party, Prime Minister Tony Blair helped him persuade Romania to sell him its state steel company.

 

Saudi Arabia alone gave $10-$25 million to the foundation, as did government aid agencies in Australia and the Dominican Republic.  Brunei, Kuwait, Norway, Oman, Qatar and Taiwan each gave more than $1 million.  So did the ruling family of Abu Dhabi and the Dubai Foundation, both based in the United Arab Emirates, and the Friends of Saudi Arabia, founded by a Saudi prince.

 

Also among the largest donors were a businessman who was close to the onetime military ruler of Nigeria, a Ukrainian tycoon who was son-in-law of that former Soviet republic’s authoritarian president and a Canadian mining executive who took Mr. Clinton to Kazakhstan while trying to win lucrative uranium contracts.

 

Federal law does not require former presidents to reveal foundation donors, and Mr. Clinton had until now declined to do so, arguing that many who gave expected confidentiality.  Other former presidents have taken money from overseas sources, including President George Bush, whose son has sat in the Oval Office for the last eight years.  The elder Mr. Bush has accepted millions of dollars from Saudi, Kuwaiti and other foreign sources for his own library.

 

Today, Mr. Clinton’s foundation has grown into a global operation with 1,100 paid staff members and volunteers in 40 countries.  It has provided medicine to 1.4 million people living with H.I.V./AIDS, helped dozens of cities reduce heat-trapping gases and worked to spread economic opportunity.





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