Mark Raynes Roberts is a crystal artist and designer, born in England.  He has worked with many of North America’s top 
Fortune 500 companies with his major works of art presented to royalty, world leaders, Hollywood celebrities and sports superstars, and in private and corporate art collections internationally.

 

Mark Raynes Roberts’ crystal art is currently on exhibit and for sale at the Plateaux Gallery at Thomas Goode & Co., 19 South Audley Street, Mayfair, London W1K 2BN United Kingdom

 

Tel: 44 0207 499 2823 

Exhibition and Sale runs October 2013 to January 2014

Open Monday to Saturday 10am – 6pm 

www.raynesartdesign.com

 

 

 

 A Very British Landscape

 

A traditional thatched cottage in Chipping Campden, Gloucestershire.

A traditional thatched cottage in Chipping Campden, Gloucestershire.

 

Growing up in England I was fortunate to spend many family vacations visiting National Trust sights in England, Scotland and Wales, gaining an early historical appreciation for the country of my birth but also the ever changing landscapes where we visited.  From summer beach holidays in Cornwall, Devon and Dorset, to adventurous climbing and sailing trips to Snowdonia, Wales, and the Isle of Mull, Scotland, the beauty of the British Isles was evident. 

 

A village scene in Baunton near Cirencester, Gloucestershire.

A village scene in Baunton near Cirencester, Gloucestershire.

 

Its beauty has inspired many writers throughout the centuries including William Shakespeare, Charlotte Bronte and Thomas Hardy, and poets such as William Wordsworth, Sylvia Plath and Sir John Betjeman.  Their writings and prose often capturing both the essence of a gentle pastoral land and the scarring effects of an encroaching or growing industrial city landscape.  From John O’ Groats in Scotland to Lands End in Cornwall, Britain is a unique collection of islands where the maritime connection to the sea has never eclipsed the central role in the poetry of the countryside. 

 

The idyllic Cotswold village of Chipping Campden, Gloucestershire.

The idyllic Cotswold village of Chipping Campden, Gloucestershire.

 

This poetic connection to the British landscape is naturally entwined in its inclement weather patterns, a marriage prearranged by nature, time and history.  From dark rain filled clouds to the finest ribbons of light which filter through them, it is these contrasts which have inspired artists like William Turner, and most recently Scottish artist, Ethel Walker, to capture what at times seem unimaginable land and skyscapes.  It seems Britain is punctuated each day by some level of precipitation, and once this inevitable outcome is accepted, one can actually revel in the magnificence of it all. 

 

Rolling countryside of Petworth, West Sussex looking towards the Downs.

Rolling countryside of Petworth, West Sussex looking towards the Downs.

 

Even though eighty per cent of the population now lives in cities and towns, its the natural beauty of landscape which still evokes the nation’s history.  Driving around the countryside it doesn’t seem possible that Britain has a population of 64 million people.  As each county and country village and town still manages to maintain its own unique individual identity to its past, melded into a landscape which hasn’t changed in centuries. The joy of driving freely along country roads (originally built by the Romans) which cut through the heart of Britain, a marked contrast to the level of patience required in navigating any inner city core.

 

A view of the village green in Lurgashall, West Sussex after a rain storm.

A view of the village green in Lurgashall, West Sussex after a rain storm.

 

In a world which is becoming increasingly overloaded with technology, is it quite surprising that many of the world’s finest five-star hotel resorts and spas are now reverting to a no-internet policy providing their patrons with what they consider to be the ultimate luxury experience.  Peace and Quiet.  Interestingly, many of Britain’s most idyllic villages are experiencing an influx of wealthy individuals from around the world seeking similar refuge from the fast-paced technological world in the knowledge that time does seem to still stand still in the British countryside. 

 

A frosty morning in the valley at Rendscomb, Gloucestershire, near Cheltenham.

A frosty morning in the valley at Rendscomb, Gloucestershire, near Cheltenham.

 

 

Often referred to as the "Cathedral of the Cotswolds," the St Peter and Paul Parish Church,  can be found in the quiet village of Northleach, Gloucestershire.

Often referred to as the “Cathedral of the Cotswolds,” the St Peter and Paul Parish Church,
can be found in the quiet village of Northleach, Gloucestershire.

 

 

 

 





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