THE NEXT 100 YEARS – ONE CHILD’S JOURNEY – HOW HE/SHE WILL LIVE, LOVE AND NEVER REALLY DIE

 

 

 18A. WHEN ANGELS CRY POWER Issue 2014 JPG 

 

Hear The Child

The Malala Yousafzai Story

 

 

 

 

In every society one would expect to see men and women, young and old, putting efforts together to assist children in every way.  There are numerous ways and inexhaustible areas whereby a child can be helped.  Unfortunately, this help has not matched the growing needs for every child and the reverse is still the case in a constant conflict-prone society where issues of human and child rights are violated daily.

 

Traditionally, one of the areas where children should receive APT (attention process training) is in communication: there is a need to hear a child and his/her views.

 

It is however, disappointing that little attention is often attached to this very crucial aspect in many families and societies.  The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Children, the most widely ratified UN convention, reinforces the fact that children are people with human rights.  The Convention acknowledges that parents and others legally responsible for children have rights and duties and play an important role in children’s lives.  There are four principles under this Convention namely:

 

1. Best Interests of the Child

2. Non-Discrimination

3. The Right to Participate

4. The Right to Life, Survival, and Healthy Development

 

It is the young Pakistani teenager, Malala Yousafzai’s story, that should further lend the global community a form of impetus to respect the opinion, wishes and needs of the child.  Malala was exposed to a situation that almost took her life after a terrorist attack, yet the young girl said, “I want education for the sons and daughters of the Taliban and all terrorists and extremists who shot me.  I don’t hate them.”  She went ahead and said, “Even if there is a gun in my hand and they stand in front of me I would not shoot.”  These are clearly extraordinary statements from a young girl and it epitomizes the heart cry of Malala.

 

Today, Malala at 16 is recognized by the world’s leading development organization, the United Nations, and also a special day, July 12 has been set aside as the Annual Malala Day.  The teenager was honored at the UN headquarters in New York City, where she addressed the UN Youth Assembly with a speech advocating global education.  “Here I stand, just one girl among many.  I speak so those without voice can be heard,” she told the UN audience, adding everyone has the “right to live in peace and to be treated with dignity.”

 

We should all strive to go beyond the norm.  We don’t need to wait for circumstances to prompt our necessary actions for the child. 

 

Hearing every child is a global responsibility for us all.  Please!  Hear The Child wherever you are.

 

 

 

 

 





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